Tag Archives: linux

How many disks can you add to a (virtual) Linux machine? (contd)

In my last post I tried to see what happens when you add thousands of virtio-scsi disks to a Linux virtual machine. Above 10,000 disks the qemu command line grew too long for the host to handle. Several people pointed out that I could use the qemu -readconfig parameter to read the disks from a file. So I modified libguestfs to allow that. What will be the next limit?

18,278

Linux uses a strange scheme for naming disks which I’ve covered before on this blog. In brief, disks are named /dev/sda through /dev/sdz, then /dev/sdaa through /dev/sdzz, and after 18,278 drives we reach /dev/sdzzz. What’s special about zzz? Nothing really, but historically Linux device drivers would fail after this, although that is not a problem for modern Linux.

20,000

In any case I created a Linux guest with 20,000 drives with no problem except for the enormous boot time: It was over 12 hours at which point I killed it. Most of the time was being spent in:

-   72.62%    71.30%  qemu-system-x86  qemu-system-x86_64  [.] drive_get
   - 72.62% drive_get
      - 1.26% __irqentry_text_start
         - 1.23% smp_apic_timer_interrupt
            - 1.00% local_apic_timer_interrupt
               - 1.00% hrtimer_interrupt
                  - 0.82% __hrtimer_run_queues
                       0.53% tick_sched_timer

Drives are stored inside qemu on a linked list, and the drive_get function iterates over this linked list, so of course everything is extremely slow when this list grows long.

QEMU bug filed: https://bugs.launchpad.net/qemu/+bug/1686980

Edit: Dan Berrange posted a hack which gets me past this problem, so now I can add 20,000 disks.

The guest boots fine, albeit taking about 30 minutes (and udev hasn’t completed device node creation in that time, it’s still going on in the background).

><rescue> ls -l /dev/sd[Tab]
Display all 20001 possibilities? (y or n)
><rescue> mount
/dev/sdacog on / type ext2 (rw,noatime,block_validity,barrier,user_xattr,acl)

As you can see the modern Linux kernel and userspace handles “four letter” drive names like a champ.

Over 30,000

I managed to create a guest with 30,000 drives. I had to give the guest 50 GB (yes, not a mistake) of RAM to get this far. With less RAM, disk probing fails with:

scsi_alloc_sdev: Allocation failure during SCSI scanning, some SCSI devices might not be configured

I’d seen SCSI probing run out of memory before, and I made a back-of-the-envelope calculation that each disk consumed 200 KB of RAM. However that cannot be correct — there must be a non-linear relationship between number of disks and RAM used by the kernel.

Because my development machine simply doesn’t have enough RAM to go further, I wasn’t able to add more than 30,000 drives, so that’s where we have to end this little experiment, at least for the time being.

><rescue> ls -l /dev/sd???? | tail
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30064 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdarin
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30080 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdario
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30096 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdarip
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30112 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdariq
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30128 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdarir
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30144 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdaris
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30160 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdarit
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30176 Apr 28 19:24 /dev/sdariu
brw------- 1 root root  66, 30192 Apr 28 19:22 /dev/sdariv
brw------- 1 root root  67, 29952 Apr 28 19:35 /dev/sdariw

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How many disks can you add to a (virtual) Linux machine?

><rescue> ls -l /dev/sd[tab]
Display all 4001 possibilities? (y or n)

Just how many virtual hard drives is it practical to add to a Linux VM using qemu/KVM? I tried to find out. I started by modifying virt-rescue to raise the limit on the number of scratch disks that can be added¹: virt-rescue --scratch=4000

I hit some interesting limits in our toolchain along the way.

256

256 is the maximum number of virtio-scsi disks in unpatched virt-rescue / libguestfs. A single virtio-scsi controller supports 256 targets, with up to 16384 SCSI logical units (LUNs) per target. We were assigning one disk per target, and giving them all unit number 0, so of course we couldn’t add more than 256 drives, but virtio-scsi supports very many more. In theory each virtio-scsi controller could support 256 x 16,384 = 4,194,304 drives. You can even add more than one controller to a guest.

About 490-500

At around 490-500 disks, any monitoring tools which are using libvirt to collect disk statistics from your VMs will crash (https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1440683).

About 1000

qemu uses one file descriptor per disk (maybe two per disk if you are using ioeventfd). qemu quickly hits the default open file limit of 1024 (ulimit -n). You can raise this to something much larger by creating this file:

$ cat /etc/security/limits.d/99-local.conf
# So we can run qemu with many disks.
rjones - nofile 65536

It’s called /etc/security for a reason, so you should be careful adjusting settings here except on test machines.

About 4000

The Linux guest kernel uses quite a lot of memory simply enumerating each SCSI drive. My default guest had 512 MB of RAM (no swap), and ran out of memory and panicked when I tried to add 4000 disks. The solution was to increase guest RAM to 8 GB for the remainder of the test.

Booting with 4000 disks took 10 minutes² and free shows about a gigabyte of memory disappears:

><rescue> free -m
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:           7964         104        6945          15         914        7038
Swap:             0           0           0

What was also surprising is that increasing the number of virtual CPUs from 1 to 16 made no difference to the boot time (in fact it was a bit slower). So even though SCSI LUN probing is not deterministic, it appears that it is not running in parallel either.

About 8000

If you’re using libvirt to manage the guest, it will fail at around 8000 disks because the XML document describing the guest is too large to transfer over libvirt’s internal client to daemon connection (https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=1443066). For the remainder of the test I instructed virt-rescue to run qemu directly.

My guest with 8000 disks took 77 minutes to boot. About 1.9 GB of RAM was missing, and my ballpark estimate is that each extra drive takes about 200KB of kernel memory.

Between 10,000 and 11,000

We pass the list of drives to qemu on the command line, with each disk taking perhaps 180 bytes to express. Somewhere between 10,000 and 11,000 disks, this long command line fails with:

qemu-system-x86_64: Argument list too long

To be continued …

So that’s the end of my testing, for now. I managed to create a guest with 10,000 drives, but I was hoping to explore what happens when you add more than 18278 drives since some parts of the kernel or userspace stack may not be quite ready for that.

Continue to part 2 …

Notes

¹That command will not work with the virt-rescue program found in most Linux distros. I have had to patch it extensively and those patches aren’t yet upstream.

²Note that the uptime command within the guest is not an accurate way to measure the boot time when dealing with large numbers of disks, because it doesn’t include the time taken by the BIOS which has to scan the disks too. To measure boot times, use the wallclock time from launching qemu.

Thanks: Paolo Bonzini

Edit: 2015 KVM Forum talk about KVM’s limits.

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Tracing QEMU guest execution part 4

The final two questions that I posed last time were to do with constructing a timeline of what this guest is spending time on.

We can easily see system calls in the trace log, and we can also see when a kernel function is entered the first time (indicating that a new bit of the kernel is now running), and I wrote a Perl script to analyze that. That gave me a 115K line log file from which I did the rest of the analysis by hand to generate a timeline.

I would reproduce it here, but the results aren’t very enlightening. In particular I doubt it’s more interesting that what you can get by reading the kernel printk’s from a boot log.

What is my conclusion after using these techniques to analyze a booting guest? Here I go:

  • It’s clunky and undocumented. Hopefully this series should help a little.
  • It would be much more powerful with stack traces. It should be possible to get them from QEMU, at least in theory, but it’s a lot of work to do so.
  • It would be much more powerful if we could analyze into kernel modules and userspace.
  • More tooling around this might make it more bearable.

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Tracing QEMU guest execution part 3

In the previous post I posed three questions about my detailed function-level trace of the kernel booting under QEMU. The first one was Which kernel functions consume the most time?

We don’t have stack traces, although that would be a good direction for future work. So if a function “A” calls another function “B” like this:

A
  --> calls B
  <-- B returns
A

then we’re going to assign just the time in the two parts of “A” to “A”. In other words, “A” doesn’t inherit the time taken running “B”. (Except if “B” is inlined, in which case the trace cannot distinguish which code is in “A” and which is in “B”).

The other limitation is lack of insight into what kernel modules are doing. This is very difficult to solve: compiling kernel modules into the kernel proper would change what I’m trying to measure considerably.

Given those limitations, I wrote a Perl script to do all that from my previous trace. I’m not going to bother reproducing the script here because it’s quite simple, but also very specific to the trace format I’m using. If you got this far, you’ll have no trouble writing your own analysis tools.

The results are at the end of the post. For each function that was called, I had a look into the kernel code to find out what it seems to be doing, and those notes are below.

  • sha256_transform is the SHA256 function. While I’m not sure what it is being used for (some kind of module signature check seems to be the most likely explanation), the more interesting thing is that we’re not using any specialized version of the function (eg. with AVX suppport). That’s easily explained: we’re using TCG, not KVM, so no host processor features are available. However on a real boot we would be using AVX, so the function should take a lot less time, and I think we can discount it.
  • native_safe_halt is the function which halts the processor when it is idle (eg. waiting for an interrupt). Is it worrying that we spend 1/50th of the time not working? Would it help to have more virtual CPUs or is there an inherent lack of parallelism in the boot process?
  • It’s interesting that we spend such a large amount of time in the sort function. It’s used all over the place, eg. for sorting the BIOS E820 map, sorting memory mappings, checking boot parameters, sorting lists of wake-up events …
  • task_tick_fair is part of the Completely Fair Scheduler.
  • If there’s a boot option to disable ftrace, I cannot find it.

My main conclusion is there is no “smoking gun” here. Everything generally points to things that a kernel (or at least, the core, non-module parts of a kernel) should be doing. So this analysis has not been very helpful.

Continue reading

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Tracing QEMU guest execution part 2

After an overnight 12+ hour run of my Perl scripts I now have a 52 million line file that consists of timestamps, kernel symbols, and other untranslated linear addresses. The only possible way to analyze this will be with yet more scripts, but already there are lots of interesting things.

Here is the kernel code entering userspace:

11409434.8589973 prepare_exit_to_usermode in section .text
11409435.5189973 retint_user + 8 in section .text
11409436.4899973 7fb95ab3cd20
11409447.6899973 7fb95ab4c930
11409469.2169973 7fb95ab577f0

Userspace symbols cannot be decoded because we don’t know which process is being run. More importantly, code in kernel modules cannot be decoded, so we only see core kernel functions.

Handling a timer interrupt:

18000723.5261105 apic_timer_interrupt in section .text
18000725.2241105 smp_apic_timer_interrupt in section .text
18000726.7681105 native_apic_mem_write in section .text
18000729.2691105 smp_apic_timer_interrupt + 46 in section .text
18000729.8361105 irq_enter in section .text
18000730.3941105 rcu_irq_enter in section .text
18000731.1401105 rcu_irq_enter + 92 in section .text
18000731.7111105 irq_enter + 14 in section .text
18000732.3171105 smp_apic_timer_interrupt + 51 in section .text
18000740.9941105 exit_idle in section .text
18000741.5481105 smp_apic_timer_interrupt + 56 in section .text
18000742.0881105 local_apic_timer_interrupt in section .text
18000744.0341105 tick_handle_periodic in section .text
18000744.6341105 _raw_spin_lock in section .text
18000745.9291105 tick_periodic + 67 in section .text
18000747.3941105 do_timer in section .text

Userspace loading a kernel module:

7806760.57896065 40087d
7806765.09696065 4442b0
7806765.65396065 entry_SYSCALL_64 in section .text
7806766.14496065 entry_SYSCALL_64 + 32 in section .text
7806766.46296065 entry_SYSCALL_64 + 36 in section .text
7806788.75296065 sys_init_module in section .text
7806796.76296065 sys_init_module + 62 in section .text
7806797.28296065 sys_init_module + 62 in section .text
7806800.64896065 sys_init_module + 65 in section .text
7806801.94496065 capable in section .text
7806802.91196065 security_capable in section .text
7806804.30796065 cap_capable in section .text
7806804.87796065 security_capable + 72 in section .text
7806805.43596065 ns_capable + 41 in section .text
7806805.92096065 capable + 23 in section .text
7806810.46796065 sys_init_module + 75 in section .text
7806815.59796065 sys_init_module + 86 in section .text
7806821.10196065 sys_init_module + 96 in section .text
7806827.28496065 sys_init_module + 109 in section .text
7806831.23396065 sys_init_module + 129 in section .text
7806839.75396065 security_kernel_module_from_file in section .text
[etc]

What am I interested in knowing? My overall goal is to find areas in the kernel and userspace that we can optimize to make boot faster. Specifically it seems interesting at first to look at two questions:

  1. Which kernel functions consume the most time? This is “profiling 101”. It may indicate kernel functions which are particularly slow (eg. they contain sleeps).
  2. The time elapsed before each kernel function is called the first time. Because studying the whole trace is impossible (by hand), finding the first time each kernel function is called may give me an insight into major timeline events — eg. the first time one of the ext4 mount functions is called, we know that userspace has got to the point where it mounts the root filesystem.
  3. When does userspace make system calls? This is related to the previous point. It’s also the easiest type of analysis to do because system call entry is easy to detect from the trace.

More to follow …

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Run Linux on RISC-V in your browser

http://riscv.org/angel/

Previously, running Linux/RISC-V on qemu.

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AMD previewing Seattle at the Red Hat Summit

The announcement is here, and according to that announcement the development boards will be available in “second half” 2015.

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