Tag Archives: v2v

New in virt-v2v: Import from .vmx files

Virt-v2v converts guests from VMware to KVM, installing any necessary virtio drivers to make the guest work optimally on KVM.

A new feature in virt-v2v 1.37.10 is the ability to import VMware guests directly from disk storage. You do this by pointing virt-v2v directly to the guest’s .vmx metadata file (guest disks are found from references within the VMX file):

$ virt-v2v -i vmx /folder/Fedora_20/Fedora_20.vmx -o local -os /var/tmp
[   0.0] Opening the source -i vmx /folder/Fedora_20/Fedora_20.vmx
[   0.0] Creating an overlay to protect the source from being modified
[   0.1] Initializing the target -o local -os /var/tmp
[   0.1] Opening the overlay
[   6.5] Inspecting the overlay
[  14.0] Checking for sufficient free disk space in the guest
[  14.0] Estimating space required on target for each disk
         ...
[  70.8] Creating output metadata
[  70.8] Finishing off

The problem was how to deal with the case where VMware is storing guests on a NAS (Network Attached Storage). Previously we had to go through VMware to read the guests, either over https or using the proprietary ovftool, but both methods are really slow. If we can directly mount the NAS on the conversion server and read the storage, VMware is no longer involved and things go (much) faster. The result is we’re liberating people from proprietary software much more efficiently.

You’re supposed to use VMware’s proprietary libraries to read and write the VMX file format, which is of course out of the question for virt-v2v, so this was an interesting voyage into VMware’s undocumented and unspecified VMX file format. Superficially it seems like a simple list of key/value pairs in a text file:

.encoding = "UTF-8"
config.version = "8"
virtualHW.version = "10"
nvram = "Fedora_20.nvram"
pciBridge0.present = "TRUE"
svga.present = "TRUE"
...
scsi0.virtualDev = "pvscsi"
scsi0.present = "TRUE"
sata0.present = "TRUE"
scsi0:0.deviceType = "scsi-hardDisk"
scsi0:0.fileName = "Fedora_20.vmdk"
...
sched.cpu.min = "0"
sched.cpu.shares = "normal"
sched.mem.min = "0"
sched.mem.minSize = "0"
sched.mem.shares = "normal"

But there are some things to catch you out:

  • All values are quoted, even booleans, integers and lists. This means you cannot distinguish in the parser between strings, booleans and other types. The code which interprets the value must know the type and do the conversion and deal with failures.
  • It’s case insensitive, except when it’s case sensitive. In the example above, all of the keys, and the values "TRUE", "normal" and "scsi-hardDisk" are case insensitive. But the filenames ("Fedora_20.vmdk") are case sensitive. The virt-v2v parser tries to be as case insensitive as possible.
  • Keys are arranged into a tree. Adding key.present = "FALSE" causes VMware to ignore all keys at that level and below in the tree.
  • Quoting of values is plain strange. I’ve never seen the | (pipe) character used as a quoting symbol before.

Luckily libvirt has a large selection of VMX files from the wild we could use to test against.

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virt-v2v, libguestfs and qemu remote drivers in RHEL 7

Upstream qemu can access a variety of remote disks, like NBD and Ceph. This feature is exposed in libguestfs so you can easily mount remote storage.

However in RHEL 7 many of these drivers are disabled, because they’re not stable enough to support. I was asked exactly how this works, and this post is my answer — as it’s not as simple as it sounds.

There are (at least) five separate layers involved:

qemu code What block drivers are compiled into qemu, and which ones are compiled out completely.
qemu block driver r/o whitelist A whitelist of drivers that qemu allows you to use read-only.
qemu block driver r/w whitelist A whitelist of drivers that qemu allows you to use for read and write.
libvirt What libvirt enables (not covered in this discussion).
libguestfs In RHEL we patch out some qemu remote storage types using a custom patch.

Starting at the bottom of the stack, in RHEL we use ./configure --disable-* flags to disable a few features: Ceph is disabled on !x86_64 and 9pfs is disabled everywhere. This means the qemu binary won’t even contain code for those features.

If you run qemu-img --help in RHEL 7, you’ll see the drivers which are compiled into the binary:

$ rpm -qf /usr/bin/qemu-img
qemu-img-1.5.3-92.el7.x86_64
$ qemu-img --help
[...]
Supported formats: vvfat vpc vmdk vhdx vdi ssh
sheepdog rbd raw host_cdrom host_floppy host_device
file qed qcow2 qcow parallels nbd iscsi gluster dmg
tftp ftps ftp https http cloop bochs blkverify blkdebug

Although you can use all of those in qemu-img, not all of those drivers work in qemu (the hypervisor). qemu implements two whitelists. The RHEL 7 qemu-kvm.spec file looks like this:

./configure [...]
    --block-drv-rw-whitelist=qcow2,raw,file,host_device,blkdebug,nbd,iscsi,gluster,rbd \
    --block-drv-ro-whitelist=vmdk,vhdx,vpc,ssh,https

The --block-drv-rw-whitelist parameter configures the drivers for which full read and write access is permitted and supported in RHEL 7. It’s quite a short list!

Even shorter is the --block-drv-ro-whitelist parameter — drivers for which only read-only access is allowed. You can’t use qemu to open these files for write. You can use these as (read-only) backing files, but you can’t commit to those backing files.

In practice what happens is you get an error if you try to use non-whitelisted block drivers:

$ /usr/libexec/qemu-kvm -drive file=test.vpc
qemu-kvm: -drive file=test.vpc: could not open disk image
test.vpc: Driver 'vpc' can only be used for read-only devices
$ /usr/libexec/qemu-kvm -drive file=test.qcow1
qemu-kvm: -drive file=test.qcow1: could not open disk
image test.qcow1: Driver 'qcow' is not whitelisted

Note that’s a qcow v1 (ancient format) file, not modern qcow2.

Side note: Only qemu (the hypervisor) enforces the whitelist. Tools like qemu-img ignore it.

At the top of the stack, libguestfs has a patch which removes support for many remote protocols. Currently (RHEL 7.2/7.3) we disable: ftp, ftps, http, https, tftp, gluster, iscsi, sheepdog, ssh. That leaves only: local file, rbd (Ceph) and NBD enabled.

virt-v2v uses a mixture of libguestfs and qemu-img to convert VMware and Xen guests to run on KVM. To access VMware we need to use https and to access Xen we use ssh. Both of those drivers are disabled in libguestfs, and only available read-only in the qemu whitelist. However that’s sufficient for virt-v2v, since all it does is add the https or ssh driver as a read-only backing file. (If you are interested in finding out more about how virt-v2v works, then I gave a talk about it at the KVM Forum which is available online).

In summary — it’s complicated.

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How to rebuild libguestfs from source on RHEL or CentOS 7

Three people have asked me about this, so here goes. You will need a RHEL or CentOS 7.1 machine (perhaps a VM), and you may need to grab extra packages from this preview repository. The preview repo will go away when we release 7.2, but then again 7.2 should contain all the packages you need.

You’ll need to install rpm-build. You could also install mock (from EPEL), but in fact you don’t need mock to build libguestfs and it may be easier and faster without.

Please don’t build libguestfs as root. It’s not necessary to build (any) packages as root, and can even be dangerous.

Grab the source RPM. The latest at time of writing is libguestfs-1.28.1-1.55.el7.src.rpm. When 7.2 comes out, you’ll be able to get the source RPM using this command:

yumdownloader --source libguestfs

I find it helpful to build RPMs in my home directory, and also to disable the libguestfs tests. To do that, I have a ~/.rpmmacros file that contains:

%_topdir	%(echo $HOME)/rpmbuild
%_smp_mflags	-j5
%libguestfs_runtests   0

You may wish to adjust %_smp_mflags. A good value to choose is 1 + the number of cores on your machine.

I’ll assume at this point that the reason you want to rebuild libguestfs is to apply a patch (otherwise why aren’t you using the binaries we supply?), so first let’s unpack the source tree. Note I am running this command as non-root:

rpm -i libguestfs-1.28.1-1.55.el7.src.rpm

If you set up ~/.rpmmacros as above then the sources should be unpacked under ~/rpmbuild/SPECS and ~/rpmbuild/SOURCES.

Take a look at least at the libguestfs.spec file. You may wish to modify it now to add any patches you need (add the patch files to the SOURCES/ subdirectory). You might also want to modify the Release: tag so that your package doesn’t conflict with the official package.

You might also need to install build dependencies. This command should be run as root since it needs to install packages, and also note that you may need packages from the repo linked above.

yum-builddep libguestfs.spec

Now you can rebuild libguestfs (non-root!):

rpmbuild -ba libguestfs.spec

With the tests disabled, on decent hardware, that should take about 10 minutes.

The final binary packages will end up in ~/rpmbuild/RPMS/ and can be installed as normal:

yum localupdate x86_64/*.rpm noarch/*.rpm

You might see errors during the build phase. If they aren’t fatal, you can ignore them, but if the build fails then post the complete log to our mailing list (you don’t need to subscribe) so we can help you out.

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KVM Forum 2015

Assuming HMG can get my passport back to me in time, I am speaking at the KVM Forum 2015 in Seattle USA (full schedule of talks here).

I’m going to be talking about virt-v2v and new features of qemu/KVM that made it possible for virt-v2v to be faster and more reliable than ever.

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Video: virt-v2v integration with RHEV-M

This video shows using the GUI to import a virtual machine from VMware to RHEV-M. It performs the conversion using virt-v2v, which is responsible for installing virtio drivers, fixing the bootloader, and so forth.

Thanks Arik Hadas. Now I just have to fix the epic RHEL 7.2 bug list — 57 bugs at last count 😦

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libguestfs 1.28 released

The new stable version of libguestfs — a C library and tools for accessing and modifying virtual machine disk images — has been released.

There is one brand new tool, virt-log. And I rewrote the virt-v2v and virt-p2v tools. These tools convert VMware and Xen guests and physical machines, to run on KVM. They are now much faster and better than before.

As well as that there are hundreds of other improvements and bug fixes. For a full list, see the release notes.

Libguestfs 1.28 will be available shortly in Fedora 21, Debian/experimental, RHEL and CentOS 7, and elsewhere.

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P2V and V2V: new release

Matt has just released virt-p2v and virt-v2v 0.8.5. Packages will be available in Fedora 16 updates-testing shortly. Read this for the full instructions:

https://www.redhat.com/archives/libguestfs/2011-December/msg00061.html

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