Tag Archives: libnbd

NBD over AF_VSOCK

How do you talk to a virtual machine from the host? How does the virtual machine talk to the host? In one sense the answer is obvious: virtual machines should be thought of just like regular machines so you use the network. However the connection between host and guest is a bit more special. Suppose you want to pass a host directory up to the guest? You could use NFS, but that’s sucky to set up and you’ll have to fiddle around with firewalls and ports. Suppose you run a guest agent reporting stats back to the hypervisor. How do they talk? Network, sure, but again that requires an extra network interface and the guest has to explicitly set up firewall rules.

A few years ago my colleague Stefan Hajnoczi ported VMware’s vsock to qemu. It’s a pure guest⟷host (and guest⟷guest) sockets API. It doesn’t use regular networks so no firewall issues or guest network configuration to worry about.

You can run NFS over vsock [PDF] if you want.

And now you can of course run NBD over vsock. nbdkit supports it, and libnbd is (currently the only!) client.

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libnbd + FUSE = nbdfuse

I’ve talked before about libnbd, our NBD client library. New in libnbd 1.2 is a tool called nbdfuse which lets you turn NBD servers into virtual files.

A couple of weeks ago I mentioned you can use libnbd as a C library to edit qcow2 files. Now you can turn qcow2 files into virtual raw files:

$ mkdir dir
$ nbdfuse dir/file.raw \
      --socket-activation qemu-nbd -f qcow2 file.qcow2
$ ls -l dir/
total 0
-rw-rw-rw-. 1 nbd nbd 1073741824 Jan  1 10:10 file.raw

Reads and writes to file.raw are backed by the original qcow2 file which is updated in real time.

Another fun thing to do is to use nbdkit, xz filter and curl to turn xz-compressed remote disk images into uncompressed local files:

$ mkdir dir
$ nbdfuse dir/disk.img \
      --command nbdkit -s curl --filter=xz \
                       http://builder.libguestfs.org/fedora-30.xz
$ ls -l dir/
total 0
-rw-rw-rw-. 1 nbd nbd 6442450944 Jan  1 10:10 disk.img
$ file dir/disk.img
dir/disk.img: DOS/MBR boot sector
$ qemu-system-x86_64 -m 4G \
      -drive file=dir/disk.img,format=raw,if=virtio,snapshot=on

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Using American Fuzzy Lop on network clients

Previously I’ve fuzzed hivex and nbdkit using my favourite fuzzing tool, Michał Zalewski’s American Fuzzy Lop (AFL).

AFL works by creating test cases which are files on disk, and then feeding those to programs which have been specially compiled so that AFL can trace into them and find out which parts of the code are run by the test case. It then adjusts the test cases and repeats, aiming to run more parts of the code and find ways to crash the program.

This works well for programs that parse files (like hivex, but also binary parsers of all sorts and XML parsers and similar). It can also be used to fuzz some servers where you can feed a file to the server and discard anything the server sends back. In nbdkit we can use the nbdkit -s option to do exactly this, making it easy to fuzz.

However it’s not obvious how you could use this to fuzz network clients. As readers will know we’ve been writing a new NBD client library called libnbd. But can we fuzz this? And find bugs? As it happens yes, and ooops — yes — AFL found a remote code execution bug allowing complete takeover of the client by a malicious server.

The trick to fuzzing a network client is to do the server thing in reverse. We set up a phony server which feeds the test case back to the client socket, while discarding anything that the client writes:

libnbd.svg

This is wrapped up into a single wrapper program which takes the test case on the command line and forks itself to make the client and server sides connected by a socket. This allows easy integration into an AFL workflow.

We found our Very Serious Bug within 3 days of fuzzing.

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How to edit a qcow2 file from C

Suppose you want to edit or read or write the data inside a qcow2 file? One way is to use libguestfs, and that’s the recommended way if you need to mount a filesystem inside the file.

But for accessing the data blocks alone, you can now use the libnbd API and qemu-nbd together and this has a couple of advantages: It’s faster and you can open snapshots (which libguestfs cannot do).

We start by creating a libnbd handle and connecting it to a qemu-nbd instance. The qemu-nbd instance is linked with qemu’s internal drivers that know how to read and write qcow2.

  const char *filename;
  struct nbd_handle *nbd;

  nbd = nbd_create ();
  if (nbd == NULL) {
    fprintf (stderr, "%s\n", nbd_get_error ());
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

  char *args[] = {
    "qemu-nbd", "-f", "qcow2",
    // "-s", snapshot,
    (char *) filename,
    NULL
  };
  if (nbd_connect_systemd_socket_activation (nbd, args) == -1) {
    fprintf (stderr, "%s\n", nbd_get_error ());
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

Now you can get the virtual size:

  int64_t size = nbd_get_size (nbd);
  printf ("virtual size = %" PRIi64 "\n", size);

Or read and write sectors from the file:

  if (nbd_pread (nbd, buf, sizeof buf, 0, 0) == -1) {
    fprintf (stderr, "%s\n", nbd_get_error ());
    exit (EXIT_FAILURE);
  }

Once you’re done with the file, call nbd_close on the handle which will also shut down the qemu-nbd process.

A complete example can be found here.

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nbdkit supports exportnames

(You’ll need the very latest version of libnbd and nbdkit from git for this to work.)

The NBD protocol lets the client send an export name string to the server. The idea is a single server can serve different content to clients based on a requested export. nbdkit has largely ignored export names, but we recently added basic support upstream.

One consequence of this is you can now write a shell plugin which reflects the export name back to the client:

$ cat export.sh
#!/bin/bash -
case "$1" in
    open) echo "$3" ;;
    get_size) LC_ALL=C echo ${#2} ;;
    pread) echo "$2" | dd skip=$4 count=$3 iflag=skip_bytes,count_bytes ;;
    *) exit 2 ;;
esac
$ chmod +x export.sh
$ nbdkit -f sh export.sh

The size of the disk is the same as the export name:

$ nbdsh -u 'nbd://localhost/fooooo' -c 'print(h.get_size())'
6

The content and size of the disk is the exportname:

┌─────────────┐
│ f o o o o o │
└─────────────┘

Not very interesting in itself. But we can now pass the content of small disks entirely in the export name. Using a slightly more advanced plugin which supports base64-encoded export names (so we can pass in NUL bytes):

$ cat export-b64.sh
#!/bin/bash -
case "$1" in
    open) echo "$3" ;;
    get_size) echo "$2" | base64 -d | wc -c ;;
    pread) echo "$2" | base64 -d |
           dd skip=$4 count=$3 iflag=skip_bytes,count_bytes ;;
    can_write) exit 0 ;;
    pwrite) exit 1 ;;
    *) exit 2 ;;
esac
$ chmod +x export-b64.sh
$ nbdkit -f sh export-b64.sh

We can pass in an entire program to qemu:

qemu-system-x86_64 -fda 'nbd:localhost:10809:exportname=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'

(Spoiler)

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libnbd and nbdkit man pages online

Let’s seed those search engines …

http://libguestfs.org/libnbd.3.html

http://libguestfs.org/nbdkit.1.html

And yes I know there are a few broken links.

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fio has support for testing NBD servers directly

fio (“flexible I/O tester”) is a key tool for testing performance of filesystems and block devices. A couple of weeks ago I added support for testing NBD servers directly.

You will need libnbd 0.9.8 and to compile fio from git with:

./configure --enable-libnbd
make

Testing either nbdkit or qemu-nbd is trivial. Just follow the instructions here.

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