Tag Archives: virtualization

FOSDEM 2018 Virtualization devroom

The programme has been published here. Looks pretty good! Lots of Kubernetes/KubeVirt this year.


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libguestfs for RHEL 7.5 preview

As usual I’ve placed the proposed RHEL 7.5 libguestfs packages in a public repository so you can try them out.

Thanks to Pino Toscano for doing the packaging work.

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Fedora 27 virt-builder images

Fedora 27 has just been released, and I’ve just uploaded virt-builder images so you can try it right away:

$ virt-builder -l | grep fedora-27
fedora-27                aarch64    Fedora® 27 Server (aarch64)
fedora-27                armv7l     Fedora® 27 Server (armv7l)
fedora-27                i686       Fedora® 27 Server (i686)
fedora-27                ppc64      Fedora® 27 Server (ppc64)
fedora-27                ppc64le    Fedora® 27 Server (ppc64le)
fedora-27                x86_64     Fedora® 27 Server
$ virt-builder fedora-27 \
      --root-password password:123456 \
      --install emacs \
      --selinux-relabel \
      --size 30G
$ qemu-system-x86_64 \
      -machine accel=kvm:tcg \
      -cpu host -m 2048 \
      -drive file=fedora-27.img,format=raw,if=virtio &

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Tip: Changing the qemu product name in libguestfs

20:30 < koike> Hi. Is it possible to configure the dmi codes for libguestfs? I mean, I am running cloud-init inside a libguestfs session (through python-guestfs) in GCE, the problem is that cloud-init reads /sys/class/dmi/id/product_name to determine if the machine is a GCE machine, but the value it read is Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996) instead of the expected Google Compute Engine so cloud-init fails.

The answer is yes, using the guestfs_config API that lets you set arbitrary qemu parameters:

         'type=1,product=Google Compute Engine')

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Fedora 26 is out, virt-builder images available

Fedora 26 is released today. virt-builder images are already available for almost all architectures:

$ virt-builder -l | grep fedora-26
fedora-26                aarch64    Fedora® 26 Server (aarch64)
fedora-26                armv7l     Fedora® 26 Server (armv7l)
fedora-26                i686       Fedora® 26 Server (i686)
fedora-26                ppc64      Fedora® 26 Server (ppc64)
fedora-26                ppc64le    Fedora® 26 Server (ppc64le)
fedora-26                x86_64     Fedora® 26 Server

For example:

$ virt-builder fedora-26
$ qemu-system-x86_64 -machine accel=kvm:tcg -cpu host -m 2048 \
    -drive file=fedora-26.img,format=raw,if=virtio

Why not s390x? That’s because qemu doesn’t yet emulate enough of the s390x instruction set / architecture so that we can run Fedora under TCG emulation.

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virt-builder Debian 9 image available

Debian 9 (“Stretch”) was released last week and now it’s available in virt-builder, the fast way to build virtual machine disk images:

$ virt-builder -l | grep debian
debian-6                 x86_64     Debian 6 (Squeeze)
debian-7                 sparc64    Debian 7 (Wheezy) (sparc64)
debian-7                 x86_64     Debian 7 (Wheezy)
debian-8                 x86_64     Debian 8 (Jessie)
debian-9                 x86_64     Debian 9 (stretch)

$ virt-builder debian-9 \
    --root-password password:123456
[   0.5] Downloading: http://libguestfs.org/download/builder/debian-9.xz
[   1.2] Planning how to build this image
[   1.2] Uncompressing
[   5.5] Opening the new disk
[  15.4] Setting a random seed
virt-builder: warning: random seed could not be set for this type of guest
[  15.4] Setting passwords
[  16.7] Finishing off
                   Output file: debian-9.img
                   Output size: 6.0G
                 Output format: raw
            Total usable space: 3.9G
                    Free space: 3.1G (78%)

$ qemu-system-x86_64 \
    -machine accel=kvm:tcg -cpu host -m 2048 \
    -drive file=debian-9.img,format=raw,if=virtio \
    -serial stdio


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New in libguestfs: Rewriting bits of the daemon in OCaml

libguestfs is a C library for creating and editing disk images. In the most common (but not the only) configuration, it uses KVM to sandbox access to disk images. The C library talks to a separate daemon running inside a KVM appliance, as in this Unicode-art diagram taken from the fine manual:

 │ main program      │
 │                   │
 │                   │           child process / appliance
 │                   │          ┌──────────────────────────┐
 │                   │          │ qemu                     │
 ├───────────────────┤   RPC    │      ┌─────────────────┐ │
 │ libguestfs  ◀╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍╍▶ guestfsd        │ │
 │                   │          │      ├─────────────────┤ │
 └───────────────────┘          │      │ Linux kernel    │ │
                                │      └────────┬────────┘ │
                                                │ virtio-scsi
                                         │  Device or  │
                                         │  disk image │

The library has to be written in C because it needs to be linked to any main program. The daemon (guestfsd in the diagram) is also written in C. But there’s not so much a specific reason for that, except that’s what we did historically.

The daemon is essentially a big pile of functions, most corresponding to a libguestfs API. Writing the daemon in C is painful to say the least. Because it’s a long-running process running in a memory-constrained environment, we have to be very careful about memory management, religiously checking every return from malloc, strdup etc., making even the simplest task non-trivial and full of untested code paths.

So last week I modified libguestfs so you can now write APIs in OCaml if you want to. OCaml is a high level language that compiles down to object files, and it’s entirely possible to link the daemon from a mix of C object files and OCaml object files. Another advantage of OCaml is that you can call from C ↔ OCaml with relatively little glue code (although a disadvantage is that you still need to write that glue mostly by hand). Most simple calls turn into direct CALL instructions with just a simple bitshift required to convert between ints and bools on the C and OCaml sides. More complex calls passing strings and structures are not too difficult either.

OCaml also turns memory errors into a single exception, which unwinds the stack cleanly, so we don’t litter the code with memory handling. We can still run the mixed C/OCaml binary under valgrind.

Code gets quite a bit shorter. For example the case_sensitive_path API — all string handling and directory lookups — goes from 183 lines of C code to 56 lines of OCaml code (and much easier to understand too).

I’m reimplementing a few APIs in OCaml, but the plan is definitely not to convert them all. I think we’ll have C and OCaml APIs in the daemon for a very long time to come.

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