nbdkit for loopback pt 6: giant file-backed disks for testing

In part 1 and part 5 of this series I created some giant disks with a virtual size of 263-1 bytes (8 exabytes). However these were stored in memory using nbdkit-memory-plugin so you could never allocate more space in these disks than available RAM plus swap.

This is a problem when testing some filesystems because the filesystem overhead (the space used to store superblocks, inode tables, block free maps and so on) can be 1% or more.

The solution to this is to back the virtual disks using a sparse file instead. XFS lets you create sparse files up to 263-1 bytes and you can serve them using nbdkit-file-plugin instead:

$ rm -f temp
$ truncate -s $(( 2**63 - 1 )) temp
$ stat -c %s temp
9223372036854775807
$ nbdkit file file=temp

nbdkit-file-plugin recently got a lot of updates to ensure it always maintains sparseness where possible and supports efficient zeroing, so make sure you’re using at least nbdkit ≥ 1.6.

Now you can serve this in the ordinary way and you should be able to allocate as much space as is available on the host filesystem:

# nbd-client -b 512 localhost /dev/nbd0
Negotiation: ..size = 8796093022207MB
Connected /dev/nbd0
# blockdev --getsize64 /dev/nbd0
9223372036854774784
# sgdisk -n 1 /dev/nbd0
# gdisk -l /dev/nbd0
Number  Start (sector)    End (sector)  Size       Code  Name
   1            2048  18014398509481948   8.0 EiB     8300

This command will still probably fail unless you have a lot of patience and a huge amount of space on your host:

# mkfs.xfs -K /dev/nbd0p1
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