Tag Archives: tip

Tip: Wake up a guest from screen blank

A few years ago Dan Berrange added a way to send fake keyboard events to libvirt guests. You can use this to inject just a press on the Left Shift key to wake up a guest from screen blank. Very useful if you need to take a screenshot!

$ virsh send-key guest KEY_LEFTSHIFT
$ sleep 1
$ virsh screenshot guest /tmp/screenshot.ppm

Update: A word of warning though. If you try this for Windows guests you’ll hit this message:

win_2003r2_x86_64_no_tools-20150401-130735

The solution is to hit other keys randomly. Grrr.

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Tip: Read guest disks from VMware vCenter using libguestfs

virt-v2v can import guests directly from vCenter. It uses all sorts of tricks to make this fast and efficient, but the basic technique uses plain https range requests.

Making it all work was not so easy and involved a lot of experimentation and bug fixing, and I don’t think it has been documented up to now. So this post describes how we do it. As usual the code is the ultimate repository of our knowledge so you may want to consult that after reading this introduction.

Note this is read-only access. Write access is possible, but you’ll have to use ssh instead.

VMware ESXi hypervisor has a web server but doesn’t support range requests, so although you can download an entire disk image in one go from the ESXi hypervisor, to random-access the image using libguestfs you will need VMware vCenter. You should check that virsh dumpxml works against your vCenter instance by following these instructions. If that doesn’t work, it’s unlikely the rest of the instructions will work.

You will need to know:

  1. The hostname or IP address of your vCenter server,
  2. the username and password for vCenter,
  3. the name of your datacenter (probably Datacenter),
  4. the name of the datastore containing your guest (could be datastore1),
  5. .. and of course the name of your guest.

Tricky step 1 is to construct the vCenter https URL of your guest.

This looks like:

https://root:password@vcenter/folder/guest/guest-flat.vmdk?dcPath=Datacenter&dsName=datastore1

where:

root:password
username and password
vcenter
vCenter hostname or IP address
guest
guest name (repeated twice)
Datacenter
datacenter name
datastore1
datastore

Once you’ve got a URL that looks right, try to fetch the headers using curl. This step is important! not just because it checks the URL is good, but because it allows us to get a cookie which is required else vCenter will break under the load when we start to access it for real.

$ curl --insecure -I https://....
HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 5 Nov 2014 19:38:32 GMT
Set-Cookie: vmware_soap_session="52a3a513-7fba-ef0e-5b36-c18d88d71b14"; Path=/; HttpOnly; Secure; 
Accept-Ranges: bytes
Connection: Keep-Alive
Content-Type: application/octet-stream
Content-Length: 8589934592

The cookie is the vmware_soap_session=... part including the quotes.

Now let’s make a qcow2 overlay which encodes our https URL and the cookie as the backing file. This requires a reasonably recent qemu, probably 2.1 or above.

$ qemu-img create -f qcow2 /tmp/overlay.qcow2 \
    -b 'json: { "file.driver":"https",
                "file.url":"https://..",
                "file.cookie":"vmware_soap_session=\"...\"",
                "file.sslverify":"off",
                "file.timeout":1000 }'

You don’t need to include the password in the URL here, since the cookie acts as your authentication. You might also want to play with the "file.readahead" parameter. We found it makes a big difference to throughput.

Now you can open the overlay file in guestfish as usual:

$ export LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND=direct
$ guestfish
><fs> add /tmp/overlay.qcow2 copyonread:true
><fs> run
><fs> list-filesystems
/dev/sda1: ext4
><fs> mount /dev/sda1 /

and so on.

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Tip: Set a root password on a disk image

virt-sysprep --enable customize --root-password password:123456 -a /dev/sdX

Useful when installing Fedora on ARM machines that only have a serial port.

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Creating a local virt-builder repository

I was asked about this today and realized it’s not very well documented in the virt-builder manual page. So here goes.

Firstly you have to (as root) drop in the file /etc/virt-builder/repos.d/local.conf containing:

[local]
uri=file:///home/YOUR_USERNAME/builder/index
proxy=off

As non-root, create the ~/builder directory (you can of course put the repository somewhere else). Drop in the disk image — in the example below it’s called os-image-1.xz, and next to it the following index file:

[os-1]
name=OS-1
arch=x86_64
file=os-image-1.xz
checksum[sha512]=place the sha512sum of the compressed file here
format=raw
size=place the uncompressed virtual size of the disk image here
compressed_size=place the compressed size of the disk image here
expand=/dev/sda3
notes=My wonderful cloud OS, version 1

You only need the expand field if you want image resizing to work (ie. the virt-builder --size option), and other fields are documented in the manual. To get the uncompressed virtual size of a disk image, use qemu-img info.

Other cloud image formats like qcow2 or uncompressed raw are possible, but you’ll need to read the manual closely and experiment a bit.

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Tip: Use gdbserver to debug qemu running under libguestfs

If qemu crashes or fails when run under libguestfs, it can be a bit hard to debug things. However a small qemu wrapper and gdbserver can help.

Create a file called qemu-wrapper chmod +x and containing:

#!/bin/bash -

if ! echo "$@" | grep -sqE -- '-help|-version|-device \?' ; then
  gdbserver="gdbserver :1234"
fi

exec $gdbserver /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64 "$@"

Set your environment variables so libguestfs will use the qemu wrapper instead of running qemu directly:

$ export LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND=direct
$ export LIBGUESTFS_HV=/path/to/qemu-wrapper

Now we run guestfish or another virt tool as normal:

$ guestfish -a /dev/null -v -x run

When qemu starts up, gdbserver will run and halt the process, printing:

Listening on port 1234

At this point you can connect gdb:

$ gdb
(gdb) file /usr/bin/qemu-system-x86_64
(gdb) target remote tcp::1234
set breakpoints etc here
(gdb) cont

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LVM cache contd: Tip: Using tags

(Thanks Alasdair Kergon)

# pvchange --addtag ssd /dev/sdc1
  Physical volume "/dev/sdc1" changed
  1 physical volume changed / 0 physical volumes not changed
# pvchange --addtag slow /dev/md127
  Physical volume "/dev/md127" changed
  1 physical volume changed / 0 physical volumes not changed
# pvs -o+tags
  PV         VG        Fmt  Attr PSize   PFree   PV Tags
  /dev/md127 vg_guests lvm2 a--    1.82t 962.89g slow
  /dev/sdc1  vg_guests lvm2 a--  232.88g 232.88g ssd

These tags can be used when placing logical volumes on to specific physical volumes:

# lvcreate -L 800G -n testorigin vg_guests @slow
  1. https://www.redhat.com/archives/linux-lvm/2014-May/msg00047.html
  2. https://www.redhat.com/archives/linux-lvm/2014-May/msg00048.html

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Quick tip: Create a CentOS 6 guest with EPEL packages

You can use virt-builder [≥ 1.26] to create guests with packages from other repositories, like this:

$ virt-builder centos-6 \
    --run-command 'rpm -ivh http://dl.fedoraproject.org/pub/epel/6/x86_64/epel-release-6-8.noarch.rpm' \
    --update \
    --install cloud-utils,cloud-init

(cloud-utils & cloud-init are examples of packages that are only available in EPEL)

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