Tag Archives: rhel

Tip: Updating RHEL 7.1 cloud images using virt-customize and subscription-manager

Red Hat provide RHEL KVM guest and cloud images. At time of writing, the last one was built in Feb 2015, and so undoubtedly contains packages which are out of date or insecure.

You can use virt-customize to update the packages in the cloud image. This requires the libguestfs subscription-manager feature which will only be available in RHEL 7.3, but see here for RHEL 7.3 preview packages. Alternatively you can use Fedora ≥ 22.

$ virt-customize \
  -a rhel-guest-image-7.1-20150224.0.x86_64.qcow2 \
  --sm-credentials 'USERNAME:password:PASSWORD' \
  --sm-register --sm-attach auto \
  --update
[   0.0] Examining the guest ...
[  17.2] Setting a random seed
[  17.2] Registering with subscription-manager
[  28.8] Attaching to compatible subscriptions
[  61.3] Updating core packages
[ 976.8] Finishing off
  1. You should probably use --sm-credentials USERNAME:file:FILENAME to specify your password using a file, rather than having it exposed on the command line.
  2. The command above will leave the image template registered to RHN. To unregister it, add --sm-unregister at the end.
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How to rebuild libguestfs from source on RHEL or CentOS 7

Three people have asked me about this, so here goes. You will need a RHEL or CentOS 7.1 machine (perhaps a VM), and you may need to grab extra packages from this preview repository. The preview repo will go away when we release 7.2, but then again 7.2 should contain all the packages you need.

You’ll need to install rpm-build. You could also install mock (from EPEL), but in fact you don’t need mock to build libguestfs and it may be easier and faster without.

Please don’t build libguestfs as root. It’s not necessary to build (any) packages as root, and can even be dangerous.

Grab the source RPM. The latest at time of writing is libguestfs-1.28.1-1.55.el7.src.rpm. When 7.2 comes out, you’ll be able to get the source RPM using this command:

yumdownloader --source libguestfs

I find it helpful to build RPMs in my home directory, and also to disable the libguestfs tests. To do that, I have a ~/.rpmmacros file that contains:

%_topdir	%(echo $HOME)/rpmbuild
%_smp_mflags	-j5
%libguestfs_runtests   0

You may wish to adjust %_smp_mflags. A good value to choose is 1 + the number of cores on your machine.

I’ll assume at this point that the reason you want to rebuild libguestfs is to apply a patch (otherwise why aren’t you using the binaries we supply?), so first let’s unpack the source tree. Note I am running this command as non-root:

rpm -i libguestfs-1.28.1-1.55.el7.src.rpm

If you set up ~/.rpmmacros as above then the sources should be unpacked under ~/rpmbuild/SPECS and ~/rpmbuild/SOURCES.

Take a look at least at the libguestfs.spec file. You may wish to modify it now to add any patches you need (add the patch files to the SOURCES/ subdirectory). You might also want to modify the Release: tag so that your package doesn’t conflict with the official package.

You might also need to install build dependencies. This command should be run as root since it needs to install packages, and also note that you may need packages from the repo linked above.

yum-builddep libguestfs.spec

Now you can rebuild libguestfs (non-root!):

rpmbuild -ba libguestfs.spec

With the tests disabled, on decent hardware, that should take about 10 minutes.

The final binary packages will end up in ~/rpmbuild/RPMS/ and can be installed as normal:

yum localupdate x86_64/*.rpm noarch/*.rpm

You might see errors during the build phase. If they aren’t fatal, you can ignore them, but if the build fails then post the complete log to our mailing list (you don’t need to subscribe) so we can help you out.

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Odd/scary RHEL 5 bug

Yesterday my colleague gave me a RHEL 5 VM disk image which failed to boot after converting it using the latest virt-v2v.  Because it booted before conversion but not afterwards, the fingers naturally pointed at something that we were doing during the conversion process. Which is not unusual as v2v conversion is highly complex.

Screenshot_xen-pv-rhel5.8-x86_64
The “GRUB _” prompt after conversion

The thing is that we don’t reinstall grub during conversion, but we do edit a few grub configuration files. Could editing grub configuration cause this error?

I wanted to understand what the grub-legacy “GRUB _” prompt means. There are lots and lots and lots of people reporting this bug (eg), but as is often the case I could find no coherent explanation anywhere of what grub-legacy means when it gets into this state. Lots of the blind leading the blind, and random suggestions about how people had rescued such machines (probably coincidentally), but no hard data anywhere. So I had to go back to first principles and debug qemu to find out what’s happening just before the message is printed.

Tip: To breakpoint qemu when the Master Boot Record (first sector) is loaded, do:

target remote tcp::1234
set architecture i8086
b *0x7c00
cont

After an evening of debugging, I found that it’s the first sector (known in grub-legacy as “stage 1”) which prints the GRUB<space> message. (The same happens to be true of grub2). The stage 1 boot sector has, written into it at a fixed offset, the location of the /boot/grub/stage2 file, ie. the literal disk start sector and length of this file. It sends BIOS int $0x13 commands to load those sectors into memory at address 0x8000, and jumps there to start the stage 2 of grub. The boot sector is 512 bytes, so there’s no luxury to do anything except print 5 characters. It’s after the stage2 file has been loaded when all the nice graphical stuff happens.

Unfortunately in the image after conversion, the stage2 data loaded into memory was all zeroes, and that’s why the boot fails and you see GRUB<space><cursor> and then the VM crashes.

The mystery was how conversion could be changing the location of the /boot/grub/stage2 file so that it could no longer be loaded at the fixed offset encoded in the boot sector.

This morning it dawned on me what was really happening …

The new virt-v2v tries very hard to avoid copying any unused data from the guest, just to save time. No point wasting time copying deleted files and empty space. This makes virt-v2v very fast, but it has an unusual side-effect: If a file is deleted on the source, the contents of the file are not copied over to the target, and turn into zeroes.

It turns out if you take the source disk image and simply zero all of the empty space in /boot, then the source doesn’t boot either, even though virt-v2v is not involved. Yikes … this could be a bug in RHEL 5. Grub is generating a bootloader that references a deleted file.

This is where we are right now with this bug. It appears that a valid sequence of steps can make a RHEL 5 bootloader that references a deleted file, but still works as long as you never overwrite the sectors used by that file.

I have written a simple test script that you can download to find out if your RHEL ≤ 6 virtual machines could be affected by this problem. I’m interested if anyone else sees this. I ran the test over a selection of RHEL 3 – 5 guests, and could not find any which had the problem, but my collection is not very extensive, and there are likely to be common modes in how they were created.

The next steps will likely be to test a lot more RHEL 5 installs to see if this bug is really common or a strange one-off. I will also probably add a workaround to virt-v2v so it doesn’t trim the boot partition — the reason is that we cannot go back and fix old RHEL 5 installs, we have to work with them if they are broken. If it turns out to be a real bug in RHEL 5 then we will need to issue a fix for that.

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libguestfs RHEL 7.1 preview packages (yes, really)

RHEL 7 isn’t out yet, but if you’re using the the RHEL 7 RC, you’re on one of our beta programs, or you can wait for RHEL or CentOS 7.0 to be released, then you can upgrade libguestfs with these RHEL 7.1 libguestfs preview packages.

Amongst the new features:

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virt-builder RHEL 7 release candidate

You can now install RHEL 7 release candidate (very unofficially) through virt-builder on Fedora 20).

Just do:

$ virt-builder rhel-7rc
[   0.0] Downloading: ***
[   1.0] Planning how to build this image
[   1.0] Uncompressing
[   6.0] Opening the new disk
[  53.0] Setting a random seed
[  53.0] Setting passwords
Setting random password of root to ***
[  53.0] Finishing off
Output: rhel-7rc.img
Output size: 6.0G
Output format: raw
Total usable space: 4.8G
Free space: 4.0G (82%)

To be honest with you I couldn’t get networking to work, so if it works at all for you then let us know how. The network worked once I supplied the right qemu options.

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RHEL 7 beta is out

In case you didn’t see the announcement, RHEL 7 beta is available. I’ve been running RHEL 7 in several virtual machines for a while, and it works great for me.

The DVD image is ftp.redhat.com/pub/redhat/rhel/beta/7/x86_64/iso/rhel-everything-7.0-beta-1-x86_64-dvd.iso but it’s probably better to use the following virt-install command:

virt-install -n rhel7betax64 -r 4096 \
  --cpu=host --vcpus=4 \
  --os-type=linux --os-variant=fedora19 \
  --disk path=/dev/vg_data/rhel7betax64 \
  -l ftp://ftp.redhat.com/pub/redhat/rhel/beta/7/x86_64/os/

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CentOS Dojo and Barbecue (UK)

It looks like I might be doing a short talk at the CentOS Dojo and Barbecue at Aldershot, UK, Friday 12th July 2013.

It’ll probably be about scripting/programming libvirt and the virt tools, but mainly it’ll be a chance for Q&A about any virtualization topic in RHEL / CentOS.

Also they have a BBQ — with beer! Sadly since I’m driving there I won’t be able to drink any of the beer.

(Thanks Karanbir Singh, Justin Clift)

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