Tag Archives: cloud-init

Tip: Changing the qemu product name in libguestfs

20:30 < koike> Hi. Is it possible to configure the dmi codes for libguestfs? I mean, I am running cloud-init inside a libguestfs session (through python-guestfs) in GCE, the problem is that cloud-init reads /sys/class/dmi/id/product_name to determine if the machine is a GCE machine, but the value it read is Standard PC (i440FX + PIIX, 1996) instead of the expected Google Compute Engine so cloud-init fails.

The answer is yes, using the guestfs_config API that lets you set arbitrary qemu parameters:

g.config('-smbios',
         'type=1,product=Google Compute Engine')
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virt-builder: Installing cloud-init in a Debian 7 guest

The virt-builder templates that we ship just have core packages from each Linux distro. You can install more packages yourself using the --install option or by writing scripts.

Debian 7 doesn’t have cloud-init in the base distro, but it is in wheezy-backports so we have to write a short script that enables wheezy-backports and installs cloud-init from there:

#!/bin/sh
set -e

# Install wheezy backports.
echo 'deb http://ftp.uk.debian.org/debian wheezy-backports main' \
  >> /etc/apt/sources.list
apt-get -y update

# Install cloud-init.
apt-get -y install cloud-init

Then we can run virt-builder, telling it to run the script during the build so that cloud-init will be available in the final image:

virt-builder debian-7 \
  --edit '/etc/inittab: s,^#([1-9].*respawn.*/sbin/getty.*),$1,' \
  --run install-cloud-init.sh

If you boot this guest, you will see cloud-init messages as it downloads the metadata and continues the customization.

(The complicated --edit option there is necessary to enable virtual consoles, so you can actually see messages being printed during boot. It will work without that option, but you won’t be able to see any messages.)

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Creating a cloud-init config disk for non-cloud boots

There are lots of cloud disk images floating around. They are designed to run in clouds where there is a boot-time network service called cloud-init available that provides initial configuration. If that’s not present, or you’re just trying to boot these images in KVM/libvirt directly without any cloud, then things can go wrong.

Luckily it’s fairly easy to create a config disk (aka “seed disk”) which you attach to the guest and then let cloud-init in the guest get its configuration from there. No cloud, or even network, required.

I’m going to use a tool called virt-make-fs to make the config disk, as it’s easy to use and doesn’t require root. There are other tools around, eg. make-seed-disk which do a similar job. (NB: You might hit this bug in virt-make-fs, which should be fixed in the latest version).

I’m also using a cloud image downloaded from the Fedora project, but any cloud image should work.

First I create my cloud-init metadata. This consists of two files. meta-data contains host and network configuration:

instance-id: iid-123456
local-hostname: cloudy

user-data contains other custom configuration (note #cloud-config is
not a comment, it’s a directive to tell cloud-init the format of the file):

#cloud-config
password: 123456
runcmd:
 - [ useradd, -m, -p, "", rjones ]
 - [ chage, -d, 0, rjones ]

(The idea behind this split is probably not obvious, but apparently it’s because the meta-data is meant to be supplied by the Cloud, and the user-data is meant to be supplied by the Cloud’s customer. In this case, no cloud, so we’re going to supply both!)

I put these two files into a directory, and run virt-make-fs to create the config disk:

$ ls
meta-data  user-data
$ virt-make-fs --type=msdos --label=cidata . /tmp/seed.img
$ virt-filesystems -a /tmp/seed.img --all --long -h
Name      Type        VFS   Label   MBR  Size  Parent
/dev/sda  filesystem  vfat  cidata  -    286K  -
/dev/sda  device      -     -       -    286K  -

Now I need to pass some kernel options when booting the Fedora cloud image, and the only way to do that is if I boot from an external kernel & initrd. This is not as complicated as it sounds, and virt-builder has an option to get the kernel and initrd that I’m going to need:

$ virt-builder --get-kernel Fedora-cloud.raw
download: /boot/vmlinuz-3.9.5-301.fc19.x86_64 -> ./vmlinuz-3.9.5-301.fc19.x86_64
download: /boot/initramfs-3.9.5-301.fc19.x86_64.img -> ./initramfs-3.9.5-301.fc19.x86_64.img

Finally I’m going to boot the guest using KVM (you could also use libvirt with a little extra effort):

$ qemu-kvm -m 1024 \
    -drive file=Fedora-cloud.raw,if=virtio \
    -drive file=seed.img,if=virtio \
    -kernel ./vmlinuz-3.9.5-301.fc19.x86_64 \
    -initrd ./initramfs-3.9.5-301.fc19.x86_64.img \
    -append 'root=/dev/vda1 ro ds=nocloud-net'

You’ll be able to log in either as fedora/123456 or rjones (no password), and you should see that the hostname has been set to cloudy.

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