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RISC-V on an FPGA, pt. 1

Last year I had open source instruction set RISC-V running Linux emulated in qemu. However to really get into the architecture, and restore my very rusty FPGA skills, wouldn’t it be fun to have RISC-V working in real hardware.

The world of RISC-V is pretty confusing for outsiders. There are a bunch of affiliated companies, researchers who are producing actual silicon (nothing you can buy of course), and the affiliated(?) lowRISC project which is trying to produce a fully open source chip. I’m starting with lowRISC since they have three iterations of a design that you can install on reasonably cheap FPGA development boards like the one above. (I’m going to try to install “Untether 0.2” which is the second iteration of their FPGA design.)

There are two FPGA development kits supported by lowRISC. They are the Xilinx Artix-7-based Nexys 4 DDR, pictured above, which I bought from Digi-Key for £261.54 (that price included tax and next day delivery from the US).

There is also the KC705, but that board is over £1,300.

The main differences are speed and available RAM. The Nexys has 128MB of RAM only, which is pretty tight to run Linux. The KC705 has 1GB of RAM.

I’m also going to look at the dev kits recommended by SiFive, which start at US$150 (also based on the Xilinx Artix-7).

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July 25, 2016 · 12:07 pm

Gigabyte Cavium ARM servers

http://b2b.gigabyte.com/products/list.aspx?s=92&p=190&v=1029&ck=102

Gigabyte just announced a bunch of full ARM servers, with between 32 and 96 cores. They are based around the Cavium ThunderX processors that we’ve had at Red Hat for a while so they should run RHEL either out of the box or very soon after release.

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Another bit of ARM server hardware: SoftIron Overdrive

overdrivetop

https://shop.softiron.co.uk/product/overdrive-1000/

The data sheet is here but in brief, quad core AMD Seattle with 8 GB of RAM (expandable to 64 GB). Approximately equivalent to the still missing AMD Cello developer board.

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nbdkit ruby plugin

NBD is a protocol for accessing Block Devices (actual hard disks, and things that look like hard disks). nbdkit is a toolkit for creating NBD servers.

You can now write nbdkit plugins in Ruby.

(So in all that makes: C/C++, Perl, Python, OCaml or Ruby as your choices for nbdkit plugins)

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Libguestfs appliance boot in under 600ms

$ ./run ./utils/boot-benchmark/boot-benchmark
Warming up the libguestfs cache ...
Running the tests ...

test version: libguestfs 1.33.28
 test passes: 10
host version: Linux moo.home.annexia.org 4.4.4-301.fc23.x86_64 #1 SMP Fri Mar 4 17:42:42 UTC 2016 x86_64 x86_64 x86_64 GNU/Linux
    host CPU: Intel(R) Core(TM) i7-5600U CPU @ 2.60GHz
     backend: direct               [to change set $LIBGUESTFS_BACKEND]
        qemu: /home/rjones/d/qemu/x86_64-softmmu/qemu-system-x86_64 [to change set $LIBGUESTFS_HV]
qemu version: QEMU emulator version 2.5.94, Copyright (c) 2003-2008 Fabrice Bellard
         smp: 1                    [to change use --smp option]
     memsize: 500                  [to change use --memsize option]
      append:                      [to change use --append option]

Result: 575.9ms ±5.3ms

There are various tricks here:

  1. I’m using the (still!) not upstream qemu DMA patches.
  2. I’ve compiled my own very minimal guest Linux kernel.
  3. I’m using my nearly upstream "crypto: Add a flag allowing the self-tests to be disabled at runtime." patch.
  4. I’ve got two sets of non-upstream libguestfs patches 1, 2
  5. I am not using libvirt, but if you do want to use libvirt, make sure you use the very latest version since it contains an important performance patch.

Previously

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Tip: Poor man’s qemu breakpoint

I’ve written before about how you can use qemu + gdb to debug a guest. Today I was wondering how I was going to debug a problem in a BIOS option ROM, when Stefan Hajnoczi mentioned this tip: Insert

1: jmp 1b

into the code as a “poor man’s breakpoint”. In case you don’t know what that assembly code does, it causes a jump back (b) to the previous 1 label. In other words, an infinite loop.

After inserting that into the option ROM, recompiling and rebooting the virtual machine, it hangs in the boot, and hitting ^C in gdb gets me straight to the place where I inserted the loop.

(gdb) target remote localhost:1234
Remote debugging using localhost:1234
0x0000fff0 in ?? ()
(gdb) set architecture i8086
The target architecture is assumed to be i8086
(gdb) cont
Continuing.
^C
Program received signal SIGINT, Interrupt.
0x00000045 in ?? ()
(gdb) info registers
eax            0xc100	49408
ecx            0x0	0
edx            0x0	0
ebx            0x0	0
esp            0x6f30	0x6f30
ebp            0x6f30	0x6f30
esi            0x0	0
edi            0x0	0
eip            0x45	0x45
eflags         0x2	[ ]
cs             0xc100	49408
ss             0x0	0
ds             0xc100	49408
es             0x0	0
fs             0x0	0
gs             0x0	0
(gdb) disassemble 0xc1000,0xc1050
Dump of assembler code from 0xc1000 to 0xc1050:
...
   0x000c103c:	mov    %cs,%ax
   0x000c103e:	mov    %ax,%ds
   0x000c1040:	mov    %esp,%ebp
   0x000c1043:	cli    
   0x000c1044:	cld    
   0x000c1045:	jmp    0xc1045
   0x000c1047:	jmp    0xc162c
   0x000c104a:	sub    $0x4,%esp
   0x000c104e:	mov    0xc(%esp),%eax
End of assembler dump.

Look, my infinite loop!

I can then jump over the loop and keep single stepping*:

(gdb) set $eip=0x47
(gdb) si
0x0000062c in ?? ()
(gdb) si
0x0000062e in ?? ()
(gdb) si
0x00000632 in ?? ()

I did wonder if I could take Stefan’s idea further and insert an actual breakpoint (int $3) into the code, but that didn’t work for me.

Note to set breakpoints, the regular gdb break command doesn’t work. You have to use hardware-assisted breakpoints instead:

(gdb) hbreak *0xc164a
Hardware assisted breakpoint 1 at 0xc164a
(gdb) cont
Continuing.

Program received signal SIGTRAP, Trace/breakpoint trap.
0x0000064a in ?? ()

Note:
* If you find that single stepping doesn’t work, make sure you are using qemu in TCG mode (-M accel=tcg), as KVM code apparently cannot be single-stepped.

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Libreboot on my X60s

Almost completely free as in freedom laptop on top, with very non-free laptop underneath:

laptop

Only a few notes about this, except the obvious which is you must have an old Thinkpad X60s which you’re prepared to risk bricking:

  1. The instructions for installing libreboot are incredibly strange, contradictory, and out of date.
  2. I used: https://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Libreboot/ThinkPad_X60
  3. I used these old sources which roughly correspond to the above instructions: https://libreboot.org/release/20140711/
  4. You need to have Debian installed on the laptop.
  5. To make it completely free, I will need to dismantle the laptop and replace the wifi card.

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