Apple G5 running Fedora 19

I bought this box about a year ago but I don’t think I wrote about it at the time (at least, I can’t find anything in the archives).

g5

It’s an Apple G5 circa 2005 which cost me £165 (from this eBay seller).

These boxes are sweet — dual socket, 64 bit, 4 GB of RAM, 80 GB of hard disk. It’s surprisingly fast for an 8 year old machine, and beautifully built. Anyone hazard a guess what this would have cost when new?

It runs Fedora perfectly, and has Alex’s “fake KVM” [PDF] support so you can run virtual machines pretty fast too.

$ cat /proc/cpuinfo 
processor	: 0
cpu		: PPC970MP, altivec supported
clock		: 1000.000000MHz
revision	: 1.1 (pvr 0044 0101)

processor	: 1
cpu		: PPC970MP, altivec supported
clock		: 1000.000000MHz
revision	: 1.1 (pvr 0044 0101)

timebase	: 33333333
platform	: PowerMac
model		: PowerMac11,2
machine		: PowerMac11,2
motherboard	: PowerMac11,2 MacRISC4 Power Macintosh 
detected as	: 337 (PowerMac G5 Dual Core)
pmac flags	: 00000000
L2 cache	: 1024K unified
pmac-generation	: NewWorld

$ free -m
             total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
Mem:          3983       3966         16          0        221       3069
-/+ buffers/cache:        675       3308
Swap:         2911          0       2911

$ sudo lspci
0000:00:0b.0 PCI bridge: Apple Computer Inc. CPC945 PCIe Bridge
0000:0a:00.0 VGA compatible controller: nVidia Corporation NV43 [GeForce 6600 LE] (rev a2)
0001:00:00.0 Host bridge: Apple Computer Inc. U4 HT Bridge
0001:00:01.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom BCM5780 [HT2000] PCI-X bridge (rev a3)
0001:00:02.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom BCM5780 [HT2000] PCI-X bridge (rev a3)
0001:00:03.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom BCM5780 [HT2000] PCI-Express Bridge (rev a3)
0001:00:04.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom BCM5780 [HT2000] PCI-Express Bridge (rev a3)
0001:00:05.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom BCM5780 [HT2000] PCI-Express Bridge (rev a3)
0001:00:06.0 PCI bridge: Broadcom BCM5780 [HT2000] PCI-Express Bridge (rev a3)
0001:00:07.0 PCI bridge: Apple Computer Inc. Shasta PCI Bridge
0001:00:08.0 PCI bridge: Apple Computer Inc. Shasta PCI Bridge
0001:00:09.0 PCI bridge: Apple Computer Inc. Shasta PCI Bridge
0001:01:07.0 Unassigned class [ff00]: Apple Computer Inc. Shasta Mac I/O
0001:01:0b.0 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43)
0001:01:0b.1 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB (rev 43)
0001:01:0b.2 USB Controller: NEC Corporation USB 2.0 (rev 04)
0001:03:0c.0 IDE interface: Broadcom K2 SATA
0001:03:0d.0 Unassigned class [ff00]: Apple Computer Inc. Shasta IDE
0001:03:0e.0 FireWire (IEEE 1394): Apple Computer Inc. Shasta Firewire
0001:05:04.0 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5780 Gigabit Ethernet (rev 03)
0001:05:04.1 Ethernet controller: Broadcom Corporation NetXtreme BCM5780 Gigabit Ethernet (rev 03)

5 Comments

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5 responses to “Apple G5 running Fedora 19

  1. labatts

    Hey, if you could humor me: How did you get Fedora on this machine? My father has this exact machine, and it is really starting to show its age with whatever version of mac os he has on it.

    By the way, his company bought the machine for him, and HE remembers that it costed $4000 at the time (what were they thinking?!?), but I have no way to confirm.

  2. Hello Richard,

    I was just researching what kind of chipsets those PowerMacs were using, and it seems the host bridge is called “Apple Computer Inc. U4 HT Bridge”, so that would be the analogy to a northbridge / MCH on a classic x86 machine, as the memory controllers also seem to be a part of that “U4” chipset?

    Is this really made by Apple? Seems hard to believe, maybe this is just a relabelled IBM or something?

    I am currently updating some data for a cross-platform benchmarking project of mine, and recently I have been adding chipset information to the result submissions, but it seems really hard to find out what kind of chipset those boxes are actually using and who built them. I have a G5 Quad here myself, but the watercooling system is broken, and the box doesn’t even make it to the shell anymore without crashing (Debian 6), so I cant’t fool around with that myself right now. Repairing the watercooling system is tedious work!

    Plus: I don’t really want to disassemble the whole machine just to rip off the heatsinks to be able to identify who really built that chipset and what its name is.

    So I guess one could just say it’s a “Apple U4 HT” chipset?!

    Thanks,
    Michael

  3. MAcFckr

    Does not work on a PowerMac G5 dual ppc 1.8ghz 2gb ram

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