Garden office – construction continues

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Update: Further progress this morning …

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9 Comments

April 18, 2013 · 5:39 pm

9 responses to “Garden office – construction continues

  1. Dean Hunter

    What is the building material you are using? It is not something I have ever seen in the `States.

    • rich

      Dean, it’s untreated pine. It will require several layers of decking-type protective paint to ensure it’s both water- and rot-proof, and I’m planning on doing that on Saturday, basically as soon as possible.

      • Dean Hunter

        How is the spacing between the inner and outer walls maintained in the sections between the windows and the door? Are there horizontal and vertical grooves in the window and door frames to receive the wall planks?

      • rich

        The door and window frames have slots that ensure the gap is maintained in the short section in between those frames.

  2. Gary Scarborough

    From the picture it look like you are using cog joints log cabin style instead of studs. Is the wall really only one layer of 2×4 thick? Do you live in a less snowy part of the world? Insulation? Heat?

  3. DV

    Very cool ! But you will never get enough plugs with just 4 outlets :-)
    How do you get the electricity and network there, though line crossing the garden ? Based on my mother experience with a temporary garden ‘home’ while she was building the real one (but it’s still up and used after nearly 10 years) roof waterproofing is the first thing going bad. They ended up putting a roll of that black tar based coating, which is not very nice but quite effective. Good luck with the project, sounds very fun. I would have planned for an opening on another wall to allow for some airflow if needed (couldn’t tell if there is from the pictures :)

    • rich

      There is a trench going down the garden carrying electricity and network.

      The roof will have several layers, including tar paper, corrugated plastic and topped with roof shingles. The shingles are guaranteed for 30 years, although I too would be surprised if they last so long. The roof will need care and attention.

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