Please don’t do this (v2v and p2v requests that are wrong)

Using v2p to get around Oracle support contracts

Problem: Oracle won’t support the database in a virtualized environment. If you report a bug, they’ll ask you to reproduce it on a supported (ie. physical) machine.

Wrong solution: We’ll run Oracle in a VM. When we run into trouble, we’ll use a V2P tool to convert the virtual machine to a physical machine!

Why this is wrong: Conversion involves copying the disks, ripping out device drivers, adding new device drivers, fiddling with configuration files, doing resize ops on filesystems, and reinstalling the boot loader. These are (a) slow, (b) very intrusive, and (c) liable to break. This is all a recipe for turning a small disaster (ie. my database is down) into a very big disaster (my database is still down and the hairy support “solution” took 6 hours and didn’t work).

Good solution: Oracle are probably right that you shouldn’t try to run your database virtualized. But assuming you want to ignore that advice, put your database and its files onto a separate SAN LUN. When you need support, detach the LUN from the virtual machine and reattach it to a physical machine. This operation should be instantaneous and doesn’t involve any modification of the data.

Using p2v and v2p to test upgrades

Problem: It’s not easy to test an upgrade on a production physical machine.

Wrong solution: Virtual machines let you snapshot, test your upgrade on the snapshot, and if it’s bad you just throw away the snapshot. Therefore to test our upgrade, we’ll convert the physical machine to virtual (P2V), do the test, and if it works we’ll convert it back to a physical machine (V2P)!

Why this is wrong: Conversion involves a slow disk copy and a very intrusive set of modifications to the configuration. P2V followed by V2P is not a symmetric operation that leaves you with an identical machine. More than likely it’ll simply break the machine, and if it doesn’t, then drivers could be less than optimal after the conversion. Plus (unlike with virtualized environments) your physical machine is a one-of-a-kind system, and if you break it with a hairy set of P2V and V2P operations you can’t just roll back to a previous snapshot.

Good solution: Virtualize your workloads! If you don’t want to do that, use a filesystem like btrfs/ZFS that lets you do cheap snapshots, or use the snapshot feature of your SAN. In any case, always arrange your production environment so that you have a staging mirror on which to do tests before you deploy anything to production, and have a tested back-out plan.

Using multiple v2v steps

Problem: We don’t have a conversion tool that can do (eg.) Citrix Xen to KVM in one step.

Wrong solution: We found something on the web that can do Citrix to VMware, and Red Hat have a great tool for doing VMware to KVM, so we’ll just run one after the other!

Why this is wrong: Conversion involves a large set of intrusive changes on the guest such as installing device drivers for the particular target hypervisor. Doing this in two steps means you go through two rounds of intrusive changes to your guest, and it’s unlikely that anyone has tested both together. Most likely it’ll break, or leave your guest with conflicting device drivers.

Good solution: Sorry, but at the moment there isn’t a good solution, but that doesn’t mean you should use the bad solution. It could be your best bet is to reinstall the guest from scratch on the target VM.

About these ads

1 Comment

Filed under Uncategorized

One response to “Please don’t do this (v2v and p2v requests that are wrong)

  1. DiedAgain

    For that last one:
    First make a disk image using your imager of choice, p2v to the first solution, restore the image, then p2v to the second if you must. That’ll keep the virtual nodes on the destination end clear of the other solution’s software.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s